Hugo Award Nominations

As the nomination period for this year's Hugo Awards draws to a close, I figure I should cobble my shortlists together. I have not made a ton of progress since last time, but there's a few new things on the list and some other categories that I neglected. The Sad Puppies released their list recently, and it appears to be less of a clusterfuck, though everyone still has their undergarments in a bunch about the puppies, which I just don't get. The brand is pretty muddled at this point, and the lists include a lot of works by authors that typical puppy voters ostensibly hate (i.e. Ann Leckie? John Scalzi? Nnedi Okorafor? Cat Valente?), though there are a few stereotypical Puppy authors. My guess? John Wright's novel will make it (ugh) and possibly Jim Butcher's book, in addition to the mainstream nominees that I think almost everyone is voting for (like, uh, my list below). I'm hoping this will be less controversial, as I hate all the requisite whining that everyone has to wade through once the finalists are announced. For next year's Sad Puppies, what they should do is allow each participant to rank 5 works in each category, and then use Australian rules voting to determine a winner in each categor... wait a second, this sounds familiar. Anywho, I'll just leave it at that and throw up my nominations (additions from last time are marked with an asterisk):

Best Novel: No changes here. I read three more eligible books since last time, but none which I think should be nominated. I really, really enjoyed Bujold's Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen, but it seems like a poor point to enter the series and I hate it when someone nominates a book and, like, you have to read 10 other books in order to understand what's going on (also not sure it's even eligible for this year). I'm currently in the midst of James Cambias' Corsair, which is still a possibility, but so far it's not really at the level of my current nominees so I'm guessing I'll leave it off the final list.

Best Novella: Duh. No change from last time, and while I have my hesitations on her novel, this novella is great.

Best Short Story: I managed to read some more short stories; most didn't make the cut, but I liked the two additions, even if I won't be heartbroken when they inevitably fail to become finalists (though hmm, looks like one is on the Sad Puppy list).

Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form: This lineup works for me. I'm betting that Mad Max and The Martian as locks, and Star Wars too (which is partly why I'm not nominating it). I'm really hoping that Predestination and/or Ex Machina can muster enough support to make it, but small, independent, smart movies rarely make the Hugo finalists. It's baffling. I think What We Do in the Shadows will only get one vote (mine), but hey, a man can dream and I do love that movie.

Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form: I added Jessica Jones S1E1 to the list because it's a pretty fantastic introduction to the series, getting right to the heart of the matter and just how terrifying the villain can be. Otherwise, I'm not particularly sanguine about this list, except for The Chickening, which is utterly brilliant.

Best Fanzine Normally a category I avoid, but I had to single out File 770 for excellent coverage of the Hugos during last year's clusterfuck. Mike Glyer covered the controversy, but also managed to highlight, you know, actual posts about the stories, etc...

Campbell Award
  • Andy Weir*
People seem to think Andy Weir is eligible for this award, despite The Martian not being eligible last year? Or was it? I don't know, but I figure it's worth throwing this up in case it's an actual possibility.

And I think that just about covers what I'll be nominating. There's an off chance I'll get to some other stuff during this week, but for now, this is what I've got. Curious to see how the finalists turn out, but not particularly anxious for more controversy and hand wringing. Still undecided as to whether I'll be voting this year...